ARTICLES

  • WHY DOGS EAT POOP AND HOW TO STOP IT
    Mara Bovsun, AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB July 01, 2015 [Original Source] Of all the repulsive habits our canine companions have—drinking from the toilet, rolling in swamp muck, licking their butts—nothing tops the disgusting practice of eating poop. Their motivation may not be to gross us humans out, but it certainly does. So much so, in fact, that poop eating is often a reason people try to rehome a dog or even opt for euthanasia. There's a scientific name for this habit—coprophagia (kop-ruh-fey-jee-uh)—and also both behavioral and physiologic reasons why some dogs view dung as a delicacy. If you have a poop…
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  • Canine Rivalry
    2000. Dumb Friends League. [Original Source] What Is Canine Rivalry? Canine rivalry refers to repeated conflicts between dogs living in the same household. Animals that live in social groups establish a social structure within the group called a dominance hierarchy. This dominance hierarchy normally serves to maintain order, reduce conflict and promote cooperation among group members. Conflicts arise between household dogs when there is instability in the hierarchy, that is, when the ranking or social position of each dog is not clear or is in contention. Initially, dogs may only snarl, growl or snap without injuring each other. Sometimes, however,…
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  • INTRODUCING A NEW DOG TO THE RESIDENT DOG(S)
    [Original Source] Keep them separated from one another initially, using crates. There’s no point in setting the new dog up for failure. If he’s quiet and good in his crate, reward him with treats for his good behavior, and simply ignore him if he’s putting up a fuss. Use a baby gate to help keep the dogs separated through the initial introductory phase. Walk them separately in the beginning. When one is crated and the other is free, reward them both with treats for good behavior and a calm response to the other dog. Rewards work better and have a…
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  • IN-HOME MULTIPLE DOG MANAGEMENT
    By Melinda Johnson, 1997 [Original Source] It's far better to AVOID fights then to try to break one up. There are some dogs that will never fight, but many perfectly good dogs will. Here are some suggestions for pack management with dogs who might fight: 1.) All meals are served in the dogs' crates, behind baby gates, or in separate, closed-door rooms. This prevents fights over food and also stops the 'piggy' dog from chowing down all the goodies out of the 'skinny' or shy dog's bowl. Nobody should be put in a position of defending their food. Mealtimes should…
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  • How To Handle Interdog Aggression
    By Mark J. Nunez, DVM Special Interest in Canine Behavior August 6, 2011 [Original Source] Interdog aggression is a very common problem that I am asked to help with. I am speaking specifically about dogs that live in the same home, not the dog aggressive dog that wants to go after every other dog he sees who does not share the same address. I have known people with multiple dogs that are never allowed to be around each. This one’s in the garage, that one’s in the bedroom, and the other one is outside. They all rotate places/positions through out…
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